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Demand soars for 8XL (80") waistbands in obesity hit Britain

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Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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  • #31776
    Lauren
    Keymaster

    The obesity crisis sweeping Britain is laid bare as demand soars for 8XL waistbands | Daily Mail Online

    Even children’s school clothing is having to make large adult size uniforms.

    I find it sad that they have to deal with this at such an early age. I was a size 32-34 before my surgery and it was absolutely soul destroying at times, trying to look smart and presentable. Goodness knows how these children must feel. I bet they also have fat-shaming bullies to deal with too. Now THAT breaks my heart. Plus the fact they are destined to a life of obesity and yo-yo dieting – just like many of us were ๐Ÿ™

    Doodah x

    #54868
    clairec
    Member

    @Doodah 34910 wrote:

    The obesity crisis sweeping Britain is laid bare as demand soars for 8XL waistbands | Daily Mail Online

    Even children’s school clothing is having to make large adult size uniforms.

    I find it sad that they have to deal with this at such an early age. I was a size 32-34 before my surgery and it was absolutely soul destroying at times, trying to look smart and presentable. Goodness knows how these children must feel. I bet they also have fat-shaming bullies to deal with too. Now THAT breaks my heart. Plus the fact they are destined to a life of obesity and yo-yo dieting – just like many of us were ๐Ÿ™

    Doodah x

    I remember how difficult it was to find clothes that fitted and well fashionable. I was an average size child who suddenly put on weight as I hit puberty for hormonal reasons. I never understood why because my eating never changed. Trying to look reasonable was a real issue and it was an age when clothes really matter. Now there are lots of clothes available for larger size people and as those who know me would understand bright colours and my bling are really important to me. I have managed that for many years now, but those years were really difficult. So I am glad that for today’s young people clothes are available in a greater range of sizes.

    However, as Doodah says, young people who are overweight at that age probably have a lifetime of fighting their weight issues ahead of them, which is sad. It is not just those who are overweight then that need to worry though. Many teenagers and young people manage to not be overweight despite having terrible eating habits which are bad for everyone. This might catch up with them later. I think the focus should be on healthy eating and exercise at all ages, rather than on those who are obese as such. Then hidden problems to do with unhealthy lifestyles can be addressed more fully which will have more positive affects throughout life.

    Claire

    #54865
    Lauren
    Keymaster

    @clairec 34913 wrote:

    I remember how difficult it was to find clothes that fitted and well fashionable. I was an average size child who suddenly put on weight as I hit puberty for hormonal reasons. I never understood why because my eating never changed. Trying to look reasonable was a real issue and it was an age when clothes really matter. Now there are lots of clothes available for larger size people and as those who know me would understand bright colours and my bling are really important to me. I have managed that for many years now, but those years were really difficult. So I am glad that for today’s young people clothes are available in a greater range of sizes.

    However, as Doodah says, young people who are overweight at that age probably have a lifetime of fighting their weight issues ahead of them, which is sad. It is not just those who are overweight then that need to worry though. Many teenagers and young people manage to not be overweight despite having terrible eating habits which are bad for everyone. This might catch up with them later. I think the focus should be on healthy eating and exercise at all ages, rather than on those who are obese as such. Then hidden problems to do with unhealthy lifestyles can be addressed more fully which will have more positive affects throughout life.

    Claire

    That is such a good point, Claire.

    You may get away with eating and drinking unhealthily as a youngster but that doesn’t mean you will always be so lucky.

    I think that if someone is happy and healthy, it shouldn’t matter a jot what the number on the scales say. However, children sometimes don’t have any choice or control over what they eat. I feel so sorry for overweight and obese children. They have the problem of dealing with the inevitable bullying that non conformation brings, in addition to all the regular teen angst issues they will encounter.

    Making bigger clothes for children is a bit like shutting the stable door after the horse has bolted in my opinion. But for adults – it’s their choice. Some of the most attractive and interesting people I have ever met do not conform to societies stereotypes and I’m rather pleased about that. Diversity should be encouraged, but not at the expense of health, both mental and physical.

    Oh and Claire, you always look FABULOUS! I regularly want to steal your clothes and accessories haha.

    Doodah x

    #54869
    clairec
    Member

    Thanks Doodah,
    My theory has always been that if you can’t blend in, or don’t want to, the best thing is not to try and aim to have a style of your own. Since the gastric bypass I have changed my clothes but kept to the same approach – bright colours and dresses which suit me best – so same idea but slightly shorter and more fitted but not tight.

    However, it is all about being healthy and happy. Those who have not been able to make the amazing and giant step forward that is weight loss surgery, dive in when you can because although it is scary at the time I haven’t met anybody who regrets it. Enhanced health and happiness and unexpected bonuses as well as weight loss are all part of the package. That is true for me too and I didn’t feel unhealthy before the surgery, and I had no real issues because of my weight and was always happy.

    All the very best to all of you.
    Claire

    #54870
    bikerchris
    Participant

    This has just evoked a painful memory for me. In my teens, I was already big, but I was active and enjoyed sports. However when I made the hockey team, I could not get any kit to fit me in any sports shop. This was before Internet shopping and my wonderful dad spent ages ringing round to find a specialist shop. Then he drove me to Liverpool to buy the kit. I was so grateful to him, but mightily embarrassed by the difficulties.

    Maybe plus size appropriate sports wear is a niche market but perhaps I should go into business

    Chris

    #54866
    Lauren
    Keymaster

    Oh Chris, that must have been terrible. But, my life, you are proof that you can be healthy and fit – and not a stick insect! What a lovely, thoughtful Dad you have. I’m afraid my Dad’s approach wasn’t as sensitive. he’s old school and at times was really quite unkind – until I started throwing it back at him!

    I’m so happy you got to play in that hockey team. Why not take it up again? It’s NEVER too late. One of my friends has taken up Netball again – she looks fantastically healthy and glowing.

    Sorry again that this evoked a painful memory for you, Chris. My life, have you shown everyone what you can do now!!

    Doodah x

    #54871
    bikerchris
    Participant

    Hmmm, I tend to think team sports are a young person’s thing, you reach an age where, fat or thin, you just don’t have the legs for running. I could probably managed a defensive netball position (small court, therefore less running).

    The absolutely best thing about getting active is the social side. My obesity was a very isolating thing, when I went out it would be head down and no eye contact. These days, I walk every day with the dog and I talk to strangers all the time, it’s fab.

    And yes my Dad was lovely and kind. He died at the end of 2013 and in no small way, losing him was a catalyst in me having the bypass. The death of a parent flags up your own mortality. I’m not going to get maudlin about it, but I very much wish he could see me now

    Chris x

    #54867
    Lauren
    Keymaster

    @bikerchris 34924 wrote:

    Hmmm, I tend to think team sports are a young person’s thing, you reach an age where, fat or thin, you just don’t have the legs for running. I could probably managed a defensive netball position (small court, therefore less running).

    The absolutely best thing about getting active is the social side. My obesity was a very isolating thing, when I went out it would be head down and no eye contact. These days, I walk every day with the dog and I talk to strangers all the time, it’s fab.

    And yes my Dad was lovely and kind. He died at the end of 2013 and in no small way, losing him was a catalyst in me having the bypass. The death of a parent flags up your own mortality. I’m not going to get maudlin about it, but I very much wish he could see me now

    Chris x

    You have brought up another really good point, Chris. It’s why I love this forum so much. We all have different perspectives and experiences that make sharing information, feelings and tips utterly invaluable.

    The death of someone as close as a parent must surely shift our focus onto what is and isn’t important. They are (luckily for most of us) the most stable and influential thing in our lives. I had a second Mum, Lee, and I still ask myself what she would do in any given situation, despite the fact that she died 21 years ago!

    As for the social side of things, I agree 110%. Everyone should have a dog (biased) they are the greatest friend finders on the planet! A walk in a nice big park is packed with ‘Good morning’, ‘Lovely looking Labrador (or any other breed), ‘Great weather’ and loads of other typically British things. You could meet people on holiday from anywhere in the world and still have a ‘conversation’ about dogs. They get us out and about, give us a reason for regular exercise and are the most loyal of friends. In fact, I would go as far as to say they should be prescribed as therapy after wls haha!

    Seriously though, my social life used to be non existent too as I simply couldn’t get out and about. Now, even though I struggle with non obesity related health problems, I WANT to get out and about – and that’s the biggest difference. No more hiding or resisting eye contact, and no fretting about whether or not I will fit in (literally and metaphorically.)

    Thanks for this Chris. You are so astute and have a keen ear for what people on this forum need to hear. You raise our spirits with compassion, and, best of all (when appropriate) sharp, dry wit ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Doodah x

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