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Booked my bypass

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 25 total)
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  • #31637

    This is my first post, I have just had my pre-op assessment at St Richards, and the staff were totally lovely. I have been very worried whether I was doing the right thing but feel reassured now. I start the milk diet next week on the 24th and the surgery is first thing on the 30th. I find myself thinking of little else and it is hard to know what I will be doing going forward. For example it is my birthday on the 24th October which is a little while after the surgery and thought we would go to the theatre, will I be up for it, and what to do about eating. Hopefully, I won’t worry so much about eating afterwards … Do the cravings disappear? if I was a comfort eater what replaces this? How do you all cope long term. I am sure I can keep to the rules post surgery and the milk diet and look forward to the challenges, so next week I will be making soups.

    I started the whole process thinking I would be having a gastric band, but have been persuaded into having a bypass as I snack and have a sweet tooth, it does seem drastic, but I feel that to have the band and then to have to go back and have a bypass later seems worse somehow.

    Any thoughts gratefully received.

    #52962
    Paul-H
    Participant

    Hi Fiona

    Well done on getting this far, don’t panic it will all be over before you even know it.

    I had my Bypass at St Richards about two and a half years ago lost 10 stone and still ten stone down, you should be ok for your birthday outing but forget about eating out that soon after surgery, you will be just about going onto mashed food after only 4 weeks and no more than a ramekin size portion.

    The cravings go as soon as you are bypassed which is one of the good things about the bypass compared to the band which does not get rid of them. You do have to watch out for addiction transference though so no swapping your food addictions for drink, shopping or Gambling, as some have done.

    Read the book you where given at St Richards, follow all the instructions and you will be fine.

    Remember to drink plenty of water post surgery, a minimum of two litres a day is most important and don’t rush through the early stages either, 4 weeks puree, 4 weeks mashed and finally introduce more solids and if the last spoon of food felt a touch too much don’t try another or you will lose the lot. You will soon learn when enough is enough.

    WLS gives you a good year to lose your weight and another year to get you head under control, as from about two years you will be able to eat most types of food but should never dish up more than a tea plate size portion as after two years you can start to stretch the pouch so do everything you can to avoid that.

    Also stay away from High sugar and high fat foods to avoid the Dumping syndrome and avoid all alcohol.

    Follow all the rules and WLS is the best thing, try to bend the rules and you will end up ruining it and regretting it.

    Hope this has been of help and ask away if you have any more questions.

    Paul

    #52963
    Whitey
    Member

    Hi Fiona
    Welcome to our friendly forum. Everyone is here to answer any questions you may have on your WLS journey. It does sound as having a bypass is probably the best option for you. I am glad I went for bypass over band and my reasoning was that I could only go through surgery once so bypass was the best option for my as I felt it was easier to cheat with a band. I had my bypass over 2 years ago and have lost over 9 stone. I am still over weight but I can now wear size 16 compared to size 28 pre op so I’m happy.
    Paul gives very good advice when he says follow the rules you are given especially drink plenty. You should be fine for your birthday but you will probably not want to eat out so early.
    Do as much research as you can and be aware of the dangers of sugar and high fat foods. You need to learn the importance of protein so get all the advice you can from your dietician.
    Good luck with the milk diet and think of it as the first step on the journey to your new life! Elaine x

    #52952
    Lauren
    Keymaster

    @Fionajeweller 32599 wrote:

    This is my first post, I have just had my pre-op assessment at St Richards, and the staff were totally lovely. I have been very worried whether I was doing the right thing but feel reassured now. I start the milk diet next week on the 24th and the surgery is first thing on the 30th. I find myself thinking of little else and it is hard to know what I will be doing going forward. For example it is my birthday on the 24th October which is a little while after the surgery and thought we would go to the theatre, will I be up for it, and what to do about eating. Hopefully, I won’t worry so much about eating afterwards … Do the cravings disappear? if I was a comfort eater what replaces this? How do you all cope long term. I am sure I can keep to the rules post surgery and the milk diet and look forward to the challenges, so next week I will be making soups.

    I started the whole process thinking I would be having a gastric band, but have been persuaded into having a bypass as I snack and have a sweet tooth, it does seem drastic, but I feel that to have the band and then to have to go back and have a bypass later seems worse somehow.

    Any thoughts gratefully received.

    Hi Fiona

    Welcome to our friendly forum.

    Congratulations on putting yourself first for once. My advice for the first few months? Be kind to yourself. As kind as you would be to anyone else.

    Follow all the guidelines, don’t try to rush things and allow yourself a longer period of adjustment (mentally) than you think is necessary. the biggest batt;e will be the one in your head. You won’t feel physically hungry but you may experience ‘head hunger’. this is the time when you have to find yourself something else to ‘reward’ yourself with. Like Paul says, try not avoid other ‘addictive’ behaviours.

    You are giving yourself one of the greatest gifts you could possibly imagine – freedom from obesity, illness and a shortened life….but you are going to have to work for it. When things get tough (and they will at times) just remember how things are now. Take photos to record your progress, not forgetting to use the old fashioned tape measure to log inch loss for plateau times. Some of the before and after photos on here are truly staggering.

    We are all here to help you. Never think that your problem is too small or insignificant. I guarantee someone else has been through it and will be able to sympathise and offer you advice/tips on how to get around or through it.

    The next stage of your life is just beginning – and it’s going to be one heck of a ride so hold on to us and we will help you get through it. I’m so excited for you!

    Doodah x

    #52969
    bikerchris
    Participant

    Hi Fiona

    Just wanted to add my welcome to what others have said. I think they have it covered with their advice and I have nothing new to add. I had my bypass 5 months ago and I have no regrets. I’ve lost 6.5 stone so far and have 3 or so to go. Yes there are days when it is tough going but this will be the best thing you can do for yourself, for your physical and mental wellbeing. I have found the benefits to be far reaching, the beneficial effects are felt by my wider family (in that they are no longer so worried about me), also in my career. I’ve just started a new job where before wls I was not willing to put myself forward in the job market as I was so fat. I’ve also resumed some of my favourite activities, motorcycling and camping. Before wls, I thought I’d never do these things again.

    So good luck and keep in touch with this lovely forum, I’ve found no end of help and support on here.

    Chris x

    #52953
    Lauren
    Keymaster

    That’s a huge bonus Chris – that your family are not so worried about you anymore.

    I was once asked whether or not people thought I had changed after having wls. My answer came as a surprise to him as I said ‘Not really, they feel I have just gone back to being the real me’. And for my part, that’s the best bit. I used to be confident and upbeat as a young woman but my weight had suffocated it. When the weight started coming off, the real me began to emerge again – the me I quite liked and respected.

    Anyway, I just wanted to say that about Chris’s comment. Hugely important in my opinion.

    Doodah x

    #52968
    audrasharon
    Member
    Fionajeweller wrote:
    This is my first post, I have just had my pre-op assessment at St Richards, and the staff were totally lovely. I have been very worried whether I was doing the right thing but feel reassured now. I start the milk diet next week on the 24th and the surgery is first thing on the 30th. I find myself thinking of little else and it is hard to know what I will be doing going forward. For example it is my birthday on the 24th October which is a little while after the surgery and thought we would go to the theatre, will I be up for it, and what to do about eating. Hopefully, I won’t worry so much about eating afterwards … Do the cravings disappear? if I was a comfort eater what replaces this? How do you all cope long term. I am sure I can keep to the rules post surgery and the milk diet and look forward to the challenges, so next week I will be making soups. I started the whole process thinking I would be having a gastric band, but have been persuaded into having a bypass as I snack and have a sweet tooth, it does seem drastic, but I feel that to have the band and then to have to go back and have a bypass later seems worse somehow. Any thoughts gratefully received.

    I had a gastric sleeve 9 mths ago I’m a patient but also a clinician and can only give my personal view which is bands never end well it may take years but the party always ends. I think you’ve made a great decision and don’t think your regret it! Just do as your told and try to relax. Drink as much as you can early on and make and freeze a few sloppy stew like meals to purée. I’ve lost 10.8 stone and my life had complete changed. Yes I still have the same day to day stresses but even the way I deal with them has changed because I have change. It takes time and self discipline but your have a fantastic tool to help you. I just wish I could have done it 10 years ago! Good luck and you know where we are. Sharon X

    #52954
    Lauren
    Keymaster

    You are so right Sharon – wls isn’t just for Christmas, it’s for life. It is the best gift we are ever given but we have to keep using it.

    Some people who have had bands have had fantastic outcomes over many, many years. The procedure has to be matched up to the individual so carefully. I had a bypass as I have an outrageously sweet tooth. I never ate loads and loads in terms of volume but my choices were incredibly high sugar/fat/calorie content. That’s why, even though I thought I would have a band, Shaw Somers persuaded me to have a bypass instead.

    Like Sharon says, we are all here to help you in any way we can so all you need to do is ask 😉

    Doodah x

    #52965
    Kimberly
    Participant

    Doubt are normal that ok , write a list as if your a lawyer giving argument for and against WLS . Then write your. Self a letter explaining why and what your hopes are . Write a bucket list of all the things you like to do after surgery . Read loads especially how to cope psychologically after wards . Think about how you going to manage stressful situation in the future . Get your self fit for surgery as this will aid your recovery . I personally choose a bypass and it has given me my life back . Nothing taste as good as being healthy . It’s funny your taste changes after surgery I love milk even more now ( I know weirded ) and initially went for bland food but recently I heading towards salty ( naughty) spice foods . I still get the food monster who torments my brain crisps ( devil food) but it usually when I have left it too late for dinner or lunch . Cup of tea works wonders .

    #52955
    Lauren
    Keymaster

    @Kimberly 32608 wrote:

    Doubt are normal that ok , write a list as if your a lawyer giving argument for and against WLS . Then write your. Self a letter explaining why and what your hopes are . Write a bucket list of all the things you like to do after surgery . Read loads especially how to cope psychologically after wards . Think about how you going to manage stressful situation in the future . Get your self fit for surgery as this will aid your recovery . I personally choose a bypass and it has given me my life back . Nothing taste as good as being healthy . It’s funny your taste changes after surgery I love milk even more now ( I know weirded ) and initially went for bland food but recently I heading towards salty ( naughty) spice foods . I still get the food monster who torments my brain crisps ( devil food) but it usually when I have left it too late for dinner or lunch . Cup of tea works wonders .

    Great ideas from Kim there!

    I crave really savoury things sometimes too but it is usually satisfied with Marmite! Kim is so right, a cup of tea is magical for filling the gap where food once stood as the go-to when stress arises. I honestly believe there is virtually nothing it cannot improve!

    Doodah x

    #52973

    Thank you all, I am sorry I have not replied before. My surgery is tomorrow!!! I am full of trepidation and excitement at the same time. Trepidation for the actual surgery, for the change for the good, but a farewell to my past. Food has played such a huge role in my life. I did Food and Nutrition as an A level and so there have never been excuses about what I should eat – I know it all but it never stopped me in the past. I have had many of the pitfalls being brought up by a war time mother, never leave anything on your plate, sweets were always the reward! I love sweets, sweet things, homemade cakes, clotted cream and cheese and it saddens me that these will probably be a thing of the past – perhaps a kind of mourning! Fingers crossed I am one of the people that does not have cravings, and thank you for the “have a cup of tea advice”!

    However on the excited front, I saw a photo of me yesterday after loosing 2.5 stone on Lighter Life (and I had been 1.5 stone lighter than I am now when I started that) so 4 stone lighter than I am now, I look the best I had for a while, so it is thrilling to feel that this will be me soon. I am ready to do something about my weight, and I have already lost 6lb on the milk diet. So it can only get better for here on. I look forward to my family being proud of me, and the achievements I make. I am determined that I will still remain someone who cooks well, so that my family enjoys good food, and hopefully we can still benefit from me being fitter, healthier and happier.

    Before I started the milk diet, I took photos, I weighted and measured everywhere so that I have a before! One question about alcohol, I do not really drink at all, if I have a glass of wine a week then that is unusual, but I do like to raise a glass at a wedding, party or have a cocktail on holiday. Do any of you have any dumping problems with having a drink or is it that too much drink is too many calories?

    #52956
    Lauren
    Keymaster

    @Fionajeweller 32622 wrote:

    Thank you all, I am sorry I have not replied before. My surgery is tomorrow!!! I am full of trepidation and excitement at the same time. Trepidation for the actual surgery, for the change for the good, but a farewell to my past. Food has played such a huge role in my life. I did Food and Nutrition as an A level and so there have never been excuses about what I should eat – I know it all but it never stopped me in the past. I have had many of the pitfalls being brought up by a war time mother, never leave anything on your plate, sweets were always the reward! I love sweets, sweet things, homemade cakes, clotted cream and cheese and it saddens me that these will probably be a thing of the past – perhaps a kind of mourning! Fingers crossed I am one of the people that does not have cravings, and thank you for the “have a cup of tea advice”!

    However on the excited front, I saw a photo of me yesterday after loosing 2.5 stone on Lighter Life (and I had been 1.5 stone lighter than I am now when I started that) so 4 stone lighter than I am now, I look the best I had for a while, so it is thrilling to feel that this will be me soon. I am ready to do something about my weight, and I have already lost 6lb on the milk diet. So it can only get better for here on. I look forward to my family being proud of me, and the achievements I make. I am determined that I will still remain someone who cooks well, so that my family enjoys good food, and hopefully we can still benefit from me being fitter, healthier and happier.

    Before I started the milk diet, I took photos, I weighted and measured everywhere so that I have a before! One question about alcohol, I do not really drink at all, if I have a glass of wine a week then that is unusual, but I do like to raise a glass at a wedding, party or have a cocktail on holiday. Do any of you have any dumping problems with having a drink or is it that too much drink is too many calories?

    Hi Fiona. Well done on losing 6lbs on the milk diet – what a great start!

    As for alcohol, it is recommended that you don’t try it for the first year. Partly because it is so high in sugar and partly that you will feel drunk very, very quickly. To the point that, even though you might be legally ok to drive, you actually won’t be. You will get intoxicated very quickly but will sober up quickly too. So, I would suggest not even trying it for a good while after your surgery. I’m 6 years out and I hardly ever drink but for special occasions, I have what I want but make sure I’m not driving – ever!

    Can’t wait to hear all about it. I always say it but I think this is the most exciting part – a bit like Christmas Eve being better than Christmas day!! Please keep in touch and remember we are all here to help you in any way we can. In the meantime, we will all move up and make a space on the loser’s bench for you 😉

    Doodah x

    #52964
    Whitey
    Member

    Hi Fiona As Doodah says the advice is no alcohol for the first year. I have just reintroduced alcohol after over 2 years after my op. I really didn’t miss it and the thought of dumping did put me off. I have found myself slightly under pressure at times at social events but managed to hold out. Now after having one small glass of wine I feel like I have had a bottle! Mr Slater did warn me that I would be a ‘cheap date’! You notice the effects of alchol quite quickly but it also wears off quicker as well. Hope your op goes well and we look forward to hearing updates x

    #52970
    bikerchris
    Participant

    Good luck for tomorrow, we’ll all be thinking of you and can’t wait to hear from you afterwards. Dunno about the alcohol, I didn’t drink before and don’t drink now. With other thinks, I eat cheese quite regularly as is a good source of protein. The trick is to get maximum flavour against minimum fat and watch the portion size. But follow the advice you’re given and leave the sweet stuff alone. I can’t say I’ve managed this perfectly, for example I had a piece of my son’s 21st cake, but it was a piece about an inch cubed eaten just after my meal. This was fine for me and I didn’t dump.

    #52957
    Lauren
    Keymaster

    You know what? I find that sometimes, just one bite: one taste is enough. especially with something like a celebration cake. I actually loathe fruit cake so I always just pick at the marzipan lol!

    I have a bit of fizz at Christmas and weddings and the occasional glass of rosé wine but apart from that, I don’t drink. I certainly don’t miss it either.

    The first year post wls is seriously a big learning curve. The biggest problem is that it will hardly ever be a uniform curve. You will be able to eat or drink something one day then the next tie you try it, it won’t play the game. For the first year I only ever ate fresh food cooked at the time of eating. I found that re-heated food was too dry for me and it got stuck. BUT, that’s only me.

    We can all only tell you what happened to us. Everyone is SO different. It’s a pretty big adventure though, believe me!

    Doodah x

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