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BBC1 – Panorama, 20:30, Diabetes: the hidden killer

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Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • #78452
    Lauren
    Keymaster

    Hi everyone

    Hope you all had a great weekend.

    Tonight on BBC1, Panorama, at 20:30 is the first of a series of programmes about how type 2 diabetes is a hidden killer that threatens to overwhelm the NHS.

    As most of us know, type 2 diabetes is linked to obesity. It is also linked to cancer and heart failure. I know I am going to be watching and listening very carefully! Diabetes was my biggest fear before I had my gastric bypass as my Aunt died young from it (just two years older than I am now.)

    If you are concerned about diabetes, why not consider weight loss surgery if you haven’t already:

    Contact Us

    Anyway, the more we learn, the better prepared we are right? It can happen to any of us, including ourselves or those we care about.

    Doodah x

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07yklv8

    • This topic was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by Lauren.
    #78458
    Lauren
    Keymaster

    If you didn’t get the chance to watch last night’s programme, you can watch it here:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b07yklv8/panorama-diabetes-the-hidden-killer

    It is not for the faint hearted

    Doodah x

    #78564
    Kitten
    Participant

    Makes you think.

    #78566
    Lauren
    Keymaster

    Certainly does, Kitten.

    How are you doing?

    Doodah x

    #78572
    Kitten
    Participant

    Hi Doodah

    I recently watched the above link, I must admit I didn’t know much about diabetes, I assumed that people only came into problems if they didn’t take their medication – and that diabetes was on the rise. I only started to look at it in a different light, when I went for a blood test, my GP didin’t say there was anything wrong with my bloods, but she did hand me a copy for my records, and I asked her what the ranges for diabetes were, she said people without it range from 35ish to 48. I then went home and saw mine was 41, and then saw that the printout said 42-47 was high risk for diabetes – well reality sank in, at 41 I was one point away from high risk WHY did no medical professional say anything, especially as I have a blood test for under active thyroid every year, no-one told me either, that diabetes and hypothyroid go hand in hand – I feel really stupid for not knowing the dangers until it is almost too late. No-one told me either that I had a greater chance of heart problems, diabetes, stroke etc when I was diagnosed with hypothyroid, they just handed me some tablets. Would it not be better to give me the information, rather than waiting until I get diabetes and then drain the NHS? I am now Tea free, as I cant find a sugar substitute that I like in tea, so I would rather go without, so obviously it is not the tea that I crave but the sugar. Also I have that sugar free monin that you told me about for my readybrek – very nice thank you.

    #78578
    Lauren
    Keymaster

    Hi Kitten

    I couldn’t agree with you more about giving us all the information we need BEFORE it is almost at the point of of causing serious trouble for us!

    I recently changed GP surgery and decided to apply for online access to my records. I checked my blood results as soon as I could. I was horrified. Several things were so low that they were at the bottom of the scale and two were so low they were OFF the scale. I will be discussing it all with my new GP next month. What is worse is that they had been low for 4 years.

    How on earth are we supposed to make the right choices about what we eat/drink etc is we have no clue what is absolutely necessary to change? Those things must have been a massive shock to you. When I was diagnosed with extremely ‘difficult to manage’ asthma, I had no idea how dangerous and even life threatening it could be.

    I think you have raised some extremely important issues here, Kitten. Thank you SO much for sharing them. On a personal level, I think you are super-human for giving up tea altogether. It’s the one thing I could not live without. Having said that, I have been told to cut down as it is affecting one of my results. I wish you could have seen my face when I was told it! I had already cut out sugar in it and was now being told not to drink so much tea. I have an urn for goodness sake! But I am trying. I’m down from 15-20 cups a day to about 10. I think that it’s best for my family if I stick to that amount as without tea, I am a monster lol!

    Again, thank you so much for this post. It will be really helpful to many people.

    Doodah x

    #78580
    Kitten
    Participant

    Oh Doodah, you went through all that surgery and life changes etc, and you had one last comfort in tea – then you are told to cut down on that as well, that really does suck, and probably made you feel like you were being punished! I did try 100% pure stevia extract white crystals as a sweetner in my tea, but it tasted very creamy, so that was a no-no, tried coffee, that was a no-no, so sod it had to go without tea.

    Perhaps our Gp’s dont trust their patients with their results, they probably think we are all stupid – could be a bit of ‘them & us’.

    #78581
    Lauren
    Keymaster

    I know Kitten! Life with less tea is hard.

    However, I’m having to cut down due to some worrying blood test results so no-one is really at fault. I’m just hoping that, with treatment, I can get back to having a few more cups each day. It really is my saviour lol! In the meantime, I have switched to drinking decaf coffee (which I am able to drink with no sugar, if necessary) ginger tea with lemon (lovely and warm) and hot cordials every other drink. It’s only been a few weeks (seems like an eternity) but I am gradually getting used to it.

    I took me 50 years to give up sugar in my tea but, like you, I cannot bear it with sweeteners in.If anyone tells me I have to give up Marmite, you will probably see the massive black cloud of misery from outer space haha.

    The only thing to do is adapt. It’s SO hard but for me, being alive is worth the sacrifices I have had to make. But I have to remind myself of that everyday lol 😀

    Doodah x

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 8 months ago by Lauren. Reason: added info
    #78583
    Kitten
    Participant

    50 yrs! my goodness, but at least you did it, and you are right being alive is worth the sacrifices, I often think of a chocolate bar, then see an image of myself in my head in a hospital bed with a missing leg, having just had it removed through diabetes or a blocked artery, and the chocolate bar does not seem so appealing.

    I am just starting to learn about blood sugar and just to show how unfair it is:-

    I had 4 light cheese spread triangles for breakfast my blood sugar levels after 2 hours were 6.4, my husband has 2 chocolate bars for breakfast, and his sugar levels after 2 hours were 4.1!

    So frustrating.

    #78584
    Lauren
    Keymaster

    Oh Kitten, that sucks.

    My skinny Dad struggles with his cholesterol levels and eats everything healthy going. My husband eats whatever he wants and his is never higher than 3.5. There is no justice in the world.

    My Aunt died of diabetes related complications 21 years ago at the age of 59. I am only two years younger than her now. When I was waiting to have my bypass, diabetes was my biggest fear. All I can say to you is that the sacrifices will be worth it. I have seen both my children graduate and become successful in their chosen careers and find happiness with partners. I never would have witnessed any of it had it not been for Shaw Somers and Streamline. Yes, I can’t eat rice or animal protein but, my life, it doesn’t even register in comparison to all that my bypass has given me.

    I can’t wait to hear all about your positives. I always get goosebumps when I hear all the ‘bucket list’ items that people tick off their list 😉

    Doodah x

    #78585
    Kitten
    Participant

    Hi Doodah

    You are right, no justice in the world – I will let you know how things go in the future – thank you for all your help.

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