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ASMBS – 10% Bypass Patients Reach Healthy BMI

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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  • #31328
    Kitten
    Participant

    I was reading somewhere that the ASMBS stated that only 10% of bypass patients reach a healthy BMI, and they only go down one category so if someone was Very Obese, they would go down to Obese, just by looking at this forum, it seems more than 10% of bypass patients seem to get to a healthy BMI.

    #49583
    Paul-H
    Participant

    Well mine is down to 26 and stable, so technically still overweight, but the final 1 to take me to the magic 25 is just loose skin, so will never go away, unless the NHS change their funding policies over plastics or I win the lottery.

    Paul

    #49587
    Kitten
    Participant

    Well done to you Paul – I assume you would rather have a bit of lose skin, than to have tight skin covering a large amount of body.

    #49584
    Paul-H
    Participant

    Exactly 😉

    Paul

    #49576
    Lauren
    Keymaster

    @Kitten 28222 wrote:

    I was reading somewhere that the ASMBS stated that only 10% of bypass patients reach a healthy BMI, and they only go down one category so if someone was Very Obese, they would go down to Obese, just by looking at this forum, it seems more than 10% of bypass patients seem to get to a healthy BMI.

    I think we can safely say that on this forum we have pretty good success rates concerning BMI. I truly believe it is because we have so much support. Not just from Streamline Surgical (not all of us are Streamline patients) but form each other. My after care from Streamline has been second to none – I could not have done so well without them, especially in the early days. However, the support from other wls patients, no matter who they had their surgery with, is paramount in my opinion to ongoing success.

    Oh and my BMI is 26 too – still have excess skin. However, Shaw Somers said: ‘What can you do with a BMI of 25 that you can’t do with one of 26?’ I always quote it and it’s always true!

    Doodah x

    #49581
    katy
    Member

    Hi

    I am 13 months post op and have a bmi of 20 (was 42). I am still losing but starting to slow now. I have very little lose skin, certainly not enough to need surgery- although I might treat myself to a boob lift one day 😉
    I think the support from streamline and this forum, a bit of willpower and a lot of common sense I the key to success
    Katy x

    #49577
    Lauren
    Keymaster

    Hi Katy

    Glad to hear your weight loss is slowing down now. Don’t forget that at around year 2-3 there could be an element of regain as your body ‘settles’ into it’s new way of doing things. This is why I always stress that a realistic goal is crucial to our psychological well-being after wls. I set myself a goal of 11st from 26 as I knew that, even though I could get down to 9st easily and not be underweight, I’m not entirely sure I could maintain it without spending every day in the gym.

    I chose the weight I was happiest with. I was the weight I am now when I left school. Mind you, everything on my body was in the right place then haha! I was also a very keen athlete and represented my school and county so a good proportion of my weight then was muscle.

    We also have to consider our age. I am 54 in September and I honestly think I would look dreadful at 9st. We more mature ladies need a bit of ‘cushioning’ to plump out the wrinkles ;-)) I started with a BMI of 64 and now is is 26. I honestly don’t think I could be any more delighted. More than that – I am alive.

    So, keep an eye on the numbers but don’t become obsessed with them. We are all so very, very different that a BMI of 30 could be perfectly normal for one person and the same goes or one of 18. There are so many different factor to consider. The one thing we ALL have in common is: that we have our lives back. In that respect we are all the same.

    A healthy BMI is the one at which YOU feel comfortable and healthy.

    Doodah x

    #49582
    katy
    Member

    I am really nervous about regain as I just can’t allow myself to ever go back to being big but I do watch what I eat and try to keep myself fit so I’m hoping that the ‘little me’ is here to stay.
    I have to be extra careful these days as my body has decided that it can’t balance it’s blood sugars so I am stuck in a cycle of dumping and reactive hypoglycaemia. My diet is being closely monitored by my dietician and they won’t discharge me from st Richards until i have stabilised. I also have to measure my blood sugars and keep high sugar drinks like lucozade around the house. It’s a bit if a nightmare as these cause me to dump but this is much safer than hypoglycaemia!!
    It’s a steep learning curve and these side effects are unpleasant but I still have absolutely no regrets as I have gained so much more in my life after WLS that a few little blips are not going to get me down!
    Love Katy x

    #49578
    Lauren
    Keymaster

    @katy 28242 wrote:

    I am really nervous about regain as I just can’t allow myself to ever go back to being big but I do watch what I eat and try to keep myself fit so I’m hoping that the ‘little me’ is here to stay.
    I have to be extra careful these days as my body has decided that it can’t balance it’s blood sugars so I am stuck in a cycle of dumping and reactive hypoglycaemia. My diet is being closely monitored by my dietician and they won’t discharge me from st Richards until i have stabilised. I also have to measure my blood sugars and keep high sugar drinks like lucozade around the house. It’s a bit if a nightmare as these cause me to dump but this is much safer than hypoglycaemia!!
    It’s a steep learning curve and these side effects are unpleasant but I still have absolutely no regrets as I have gained so much more in my life after WLS that a few little blips are not going to get me down!
    Love Katy x

    What a truly inspirational post. Thank you for sharing it with us Katy. I have absolutely no doubt that you will manage everything as you have such a strong desire to remain healthier. As for regain, well I gained 4lbs going through the menopause – woopdy doo 4lbs! Hardly going to have any impact on my life is it?! It doesn’t have to happen to a frightening degree. Like you, I keep an eye on things. However, I am not fixated on numbers and rarely weigh myself. My clothes tell me if I need to go back to basics and by that I mean soup for a few weeks until things have ‘re-set’. When my jeans are comfy again, I ease up a bit but NEVER revert back to how I used to be. I love being healthier too much.

    Thanks again Katy xx

    Doodah x

    #49585
    Paul-H
    Participant

    Also one other thing to remember is that the ASMBS is American and is probably using American data.

    In America the only qualification you need to meet is if you or your insurers can pay for it, judging by all the American WLS program’s I have watched they don’t do any of the Phsycoligical or Dietry support that they do over here, especially if you are getting the NHS to pay. If the average Americal WLS patient is anything like most of the patients featured in their program’s then in is not a surprise that they have such a high failure rate. Over here WLS has a very high success rate with Bypass surgery Bering the most successful and accounting for the vast majority of the 95% success rate often quoted over here. Compare that to the 95% failure rate of diets alone and you will soon see just how good WLS can be if done properly and done on the right type of patient.

    Not everyone is suitable for WLS and the more surgeries they do on unsuitable patients the more failures they have, this is one of those cases where having he money is not nessesaraly a good thing.

    Paul

    #49588
    Kitten
    Participant

    That’s good to know. What I could not understand was the article in which I read it, was a negative one for wls, so why would the ASMBS also start saying negative things about wls – unless there was money involved. They were also saying that part of the stomach was sealed at both ends, so there was nowhere for something to escape (cant remember what) so it could explode. I came away from that article quite quickly!

    #49586
    Paul-H
    Participant

    That not how its done over here, the disconnected part of the stomach is re connected lower down the intestine so all the stomach acids are still used in the digestive process, the just bypass the first bit of the bypass. Nothing is sealed and nothing can explode, don’t know what they are doing in America that is different to what they are doing over here and to be honest that just sounds wrong, I wonder if the article was actually written by the ASMBS or by a journalist using their data and just getting it all wrong.

    Bypass surgery when done correctly has a very very high success rate.

    Can you post a link to the article in question, I would like to read some of the nonsense they wrote.

    Paul

    #49579
    Lauren
    Keymaster

    @Paul-H 28248 wrote:

    That not how its done over here, the disconnected part of the stomach is re connected lower down the intestine so all the stomach acids are still used in the digestive process, the just bypass the first bit of the bypass. Nothing is sealed and nothing can explode, don’t know what they are doing in America that is different to what they are doing over here and to be honest that just sounds wrong, I wonder if the article was actually written by the ASMBS or by a journalist using their data and just getting it all wrong.

    Bypass surgery when done correctly has a very very high success rate.

    Can you post a link to the article in question, I would like to read some of the nonsense they wrote.

    Paul

    Perfect reply Paul. I too would love to read that article if you could post the link or point me in the right direction and I will do it for you.

    Not many people realise that unlike say, a gastric sleeve, a gastric bypass is fully reversible as nothing is removed from the digestive system. So, if someone has to have it reversed for medical reasons ie cancer treatment, it can be done. I’m pretty certain that no-one has ever ASKED for it to be reversed though!

    Doodah x

    #49589
    Kitten
    Participant

    Well that’s just typical, I cant find the article, If I do come across it, I will let you know, its because I was on the net doing a search for about 3 hours straight, so now I cant remember where things are. But thank you for putting my mind at rest, I shall research UK things only! And I think it was a journalist saying the wrong things, because there was nothing but negative comments from start to finish.

    #49580
    Lauren
    Keymaster

    I guess we have to accept that some people will always be against wls for entirely their own reasons. I would bet my best hat on the fact that they are against what they don’t know or understand. Either that or they have tried it, not worked as hard as they should have (because wls is a cheat isn’t it!!??) and are feeling bitter about it.

    Wls surgery is an amazing tool. Tools have to be used and practised with to be able to perform the task properly. A log doesn’t chop itself into firewood – someone has to work up a good sweat to make it happen. It’s exactly the same with wls. If a person doesn’t have the wls tool, it is like trying to chop up firewood with a butter knife.

    Stick with the UK sites to get the information that is applicable to you is my humble opinion. Glean knowledge and support from wherever you can and make sure you are made to feel welcome and valued: you will always be both those things here 😉

    Doodah x

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